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This site is building. Please come back soon to see what interesting articles are published.

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I'll create pages similar to this one for the articles in my e-zine. I'll change the title of each page I create to reflect its specific content.

Since long blocks of text are difficult to read online, I'll break the articles up with pictures or clipart as appropriate.

Gondolas in Venice; Actual size=240 pixels wide

Immigrant ship "Maulesden"

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The Arrival of an Immigrant Ship

Did you ever see a cargo of immigrants arrive in Australia? No! Then you have a treat in store. I will endeavour to give you some idea of what you will see. On boarding her you are liable to fall into error - to imagine yourself a hero - for ten to one theyll cheer you. Calm your agitation, and take it meekly.

What a heterogeneous mass of humanity is here congregated! All grades, all natures, all sizes, and all beauties are here represented - for everybody is beautiful to some one or other - hence contrasts.

Pressing eagerly to the bulwarks are scores of happy expectant faces, eager to see an inhabitant of the land of promise, and pleased to find that he is not strikingly unlike themselves. The young man whose fortunes in the land of his birth did not progress so rapidly as he desired, and who regarded Australia as the only country where a man is rewarded according to his worth, is there. The young woman, who, tired of drudgery and toil, hearing that here the maid is at least as good as her mistress, and is sure to marry a rich man, is there also.

The father, with his large family finds, in the land of labour and scarcity, his pay insufficient for the proper rearing and nourishment of his little ones and seeks a land of enterprise and progress - he is there also.

The Governess, whose life has been a series of trials and annoyances, comes to seek a home where refinement and accomplishments will be appreciated and recompensed.

The young doctor, who finds the towns and villages of the sea-girt land overstocked with members of his profession, seeks a wider field for his labours, and breathes success in the very breeze which comes from the shores of the land of his adoption.

Here a brief-less barrister, having heard of the immense fortunes made by bush lawyers, brings his memories of the Chancery Court to utilise them with diggings J.P.! I mingle my wishes for his success with doubts.

The navvy, who comes to clear a path for the great iron horse to scour through our land, looks bright, for he
does not like the water; a life of inactivity would never suit him, and the voyage is particularly irksome, his cheer is by far the loudest when you board.

There we see a couple who were married just before they sailed, and have come to seek their fortunes in the Paradise of the South. Another couple standing near them look hopeful. They have made each others acquaintance on board, in spite of Captain, Surgeon- Superintendent, and officers, and are going to be married when they land.

Who is this poor fellow, dressed out as if for a flower-show? He was the Neer-do-well of the family. He has been a great favourite on board, for he had a good stock of sweet things and tobacco, provided by a doting mother and a secretly gratified father on his leaving home. He is to be pitied! He has no trade, no profession, and unless he has letters of introduction to the Governor, Colonial Secretary, or some other mighty magnate, he will have to starve in the Land of Promise.

Heres a miner who argued with himself that to dig for gold was as easy as to dig for coal, and has emigrated as a sequence to that argument. Others, clerks, barmaids, shoemakers, tailors, butchers, bakers, carpenters, joiners and all description of tradesmen crowd round you and solicit the minutest information as to the demand for persons of their individual callings in Australia.

The aged couple seated there looking anxiously towards the land, are expecting to see their son, who has been out here for years providing a home for them to pass their declining years in comfort with him under the Southern Cross.

The sister coming to join her brother, and the expectant bride coming to unite herself to him who left her when he went in advance to the land of gold, and has now sent for her, as he is unable, or economically and wisely unwilling, to incur the extra expense of a trip home for himself, and risk the falling off of his business through
neglect.

Here an Australian, who has been to see the mother country and get a little polish. He has been thought a marvellous creature by those who heard his stories of Australian adventure told on the voyage out.

Here a youth, born in Australia of English parents who appreciate the benefits of a good sound English education, and sent him home to get it.

Another Australian here views the shore with glistening eye. He has tried English forms and English conventionalities, and longs for the free air of his native land again.

Here a good parson or priest coming to add their labours to those of their brethren in the army which fights the good fight.

An artist, looking landward, feels full of hope that amidst such beauties his pencil and brush will find scope and profit. Here is an actor. He seems less affected by the surroundings than all the rest.

Why? Because this will but be like another fresh appearance. He is accustomed to change, and regards the
new country only as he would a new town on a provincial tour at home.

What a mingling of hopes and aspirations are here! How many will quaff the cup of success? How many drink the dregs of the bitter goblet of despair? It is not my province just now to follow them beyond the bulwark rails.

Perhaps by to-morrow night all the tradesmen will be engaged, all the girls in service, the single married, the miner on his way to the diggings, the youth with his parents, the parents with their son, and all full of joy and happiness.